Understanding AI and its implications

Do we understand AI and its implications well enough?

Are you with Elon Musk who believes AI could lead to WW3 and is urging for AI regulation, or are you leaning towards Bill Gates’ opinion that we’re all panicking?

“The government of UAE appointed its first Minister of Artificial Intelligence in October, days after the UAE’s 2031 AI strategy was unveiled. Omar Bin Sultan Al Olama, formerly the Deputy Director of the nation’s Future department, will take on the role. The government aims to harness AI to increase the GDP by 35%, reduce government costs by 50%, implement a robot police force, and improve education by 2031. These plans reflect the UAE’s desire to be the “most prepared” country for artificial intelligence, according to Prime Minister Shaikh Mohammad.

This is the nation that just released plans to establish a 600,000 person-strong city on Mars by 2117. Clearly the UAE isn’t waiting around for the future to arrive. So when a government as future-focused as this one establishes an entire ministry devoted to AI, you’d better believe that this technology is significant and essential to master.” (via TrendWatching.com)

In other news, Sophia the robot is now a citizen of Saudi Arabia and you can watch her speak about her feelings to Reuters’ at Web Summit in Lisbon. This makes Saudi Arabia the first country in the world to grant citizenship to a robot.

Also, “meet the high schooler shaking up Artificial Intelligence” with no undergraduate and graduate degree, see how farmers in India use AI to help them with their crops, laugh as scammers get frustrated with an AI chatbot, and despair over ethics of AI development.

Our MACE16 student Michelle Petersen decided to develop her own understanding of the AI agenda as part of her MACE Personal Research Project, and I am pleased to welcome her to the BS7705 Mapping the Creative Economy class today to talk about her work on “What role can machine learning techniques play in the film industry; and how do UK film practitioners appraise machine learning in filmmaking?”. Michelle’s research tackles a complex topic but delivers real accessible understanding. Michelle presented her research at the 16th International Colloquium on Arts, Heritage, Non-Profit and Social Marketing organised by Kingston Business School and the Academy of Marketing 8 September 2017.

Do you think we understand AI and its implications well enough?

Advertisements

Connecting the dots of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

“Ubiquitous, mobile supercomputing. Artificially-intelligent robots. Self-driving cars. Neuro-technological brain enhancements. Genetic editing. The evidence of dramatic change is all around us and it’s happening at exponential speed. Previous industrial revolutions liberated humankind from animal power, made mass production possible and brought digital capabilities to billions of people. This Fourth Industrial Revolution is, however, fundamentally different. It is characterized by a range of new technologies that are fusing the physical, digital and biological worlds, impacting all disciplines, economies and industries, and even challenging ideas about what it means to be human.”

(via http://www.weforum.org/)

How do we remain relevant in this fast-evolving context?

Denying change is futile. Yet, the inability to understand and adapt to change is omnipresent in the economic, political, and social arenas alike, where it holds great destructive power because it represents itself through conservatism that inevitably leads to a conflict between outdated systems and institutions, as all the current events on the global scene show. In times of change, power is found in one’s ability to follow changeto adapt to change, and ultimately, to create a change, and not in the capacity to offer strong resistance or opposition to change.

I am very pleased to welcome Celina Schlieckmann (MACE16) to the BS7705 Mapping the Creative Economy class today to talk about her personal research project: “The skill sets for the new economy in the creative industries: a comparative study between Brazil and the UK”, as an effort to contextualise the challenges and opportunities of working in the creative industries nowadays and looking into the future.

Connect the dots.   . . . 

(Connect the dots between videos 1, 2 and 3 posted in our MACE Facebook group –  waiting for a discussion on those three videos and themes)

 

Student Stories: Janja Popovic: My first business hackathon with Gorenje and Microsoft

Janja Popović (MACE16, Fashion & the Creative Economy) recently participated in a business hackathon in Slovenia – check out the blog post she wrote about it: My first Business Hackathon http://www.styljanje.co.uk/my-first-business-hackathon-with-gorenje-and-microsoft/

You will notice that they worked in a way that is very similar to the way we work. Most importantly though, you will notice Janja’s confidence. I always admired her entrepreneurial spirit and determination and it is fantastic to see our MACErs go above and beyond their discipline with courage. Keep going, Janja Popović!

Student Stories: Intellectual Property Rights And How To Obtain Permission

FunctionOfBeat

Somewhere in London Being incognito 👀

Here are three things I will never forget when it comes to Intellectual Property Rights, as explained to us by Ms. Naomi Korn in her workshop.

No. 1: You probably knew this but just didn’t do it (to dancers):

You must obtain permission from the owner of the copyright of any music you wish to play in a public place or to perform to music in a public place. You must also get additional permission to post the footage on youtube, instagram, or Facebook (or any social media).

No. 2: I bet you didn’t know this  (to all artists):

When you post anything that you own the copyright to on social media (a drawing of yours, a dance clip of yours, an excerpt from a book you wrote, or a sculpture that you created that took 4 years to complete…) you lose the copy right to your…

View original post 363 more words