Frieze Art Fair – a study visit

Jonas has written an interesting post on our study visit to Frieze Art Fair last week. What did you learn, and what do you think (and feel) about the fair?

Jonas Kniel

“The spaces of public encounter, I suggest, are iconic with the spaces of discussion and debate that, from time to time, flourish in the interstices of financial and commercial institutions and personal budgetary concerns.[….]
Such is the Frieze Art Fair, where what Habermas (1989) calls the ‘culture debating public’ (of students, connoisseurs, artists, and critics) comes face to face with the culture-consuming society of Horkheimer and Adorno’s ([1944] 1972) despised culture industry—the buyers and sellers of cultural products. Frieze, like all other fairs of its type (e.g., Basel, Miami Beach, Berlin, Cologne, Turin, Venice), cuts to the heart of the relations between art, economics, and aesthetics.” (J. Kapferer, 2010)

Excerpts such as these still fresh in the back of my mind we (MACE) make our way to the Frieze Art Fair on Friday the 5.th of October. We have properly prepared by reading critical and less critical articles about Fairs…

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Business Models and Emotions

Kristen’s post raises several excellent questions we will be working on throughout the year. Look forward to class debates!

Womble On

42199186_10216108083367772_6973378750838734848_nEarlier this week, MACE students went to the London Design Festival Biennale at the Somerset House. This was an interactive exhibit with the theme of “Emotional States.” Countries submitted projects and were each given a room in which to display their work.

Before going to this exhibit, I had never really thought of countries as having emotional states. Do the emotional states of countries always come from the people, and if not, what are the other factors that contribute?

Some rooms were a reflection of that country’s current emotional state, some tried to get the visitors in a certain emotional state that may or may not have had anything to do with that country’s emotional state. Some were fluid states, some were static. Most countries focused on their present emotional state but some exhibits went further and also showed their outlook on their emotional state. It could be said that…

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Understanding AI and its implications

Do we understand AI and its implications well enough?

Are you with Elon Musk who believes AI could lead to WW3 and is urging for AI regulation, or are you leaning towards Bill Gates’ opinion that we’re all panicking?

“The government of UAE appointed its first Minister of Artificial Intelligence in October, days after the UAE’s 2031 AI strategy was unveiled. Omar Bin Sultan Al Olama, formerly the Deputy Director of the nation’s Future department, will take on the role. The government aims to harness AI to increase the GDP by 35%, reduce government costs by 50%, implement a robot police force, and improve education by 2031. These plans reflect the UAE’s desire to be the “most prepared” country for artificial intelligence, according to Prime Minister Shaikh Mohammad.

This is the nation that just released plans to establish a 600,000 person-strong city on Mars by 2117. Clearly the UAE isn’t waiting around for the future to arrive. So when a government as future-focused as this one establishes an entire ministry devoted to AI, you’d better believe that this technology is significant and essential to master.” (via TrendWatching.com)

In other news, Sophia the robot is now a citizen of Saudi Arabia and you can watch her speak about her feelings to Reuters’ at Web Summit in Lisbon. This makes Saudi Arabia the first country in the world to grant citizenship to a robot.

Also, “meet the high schooler shaking up Artificial Intelligence” with no undergraduate and graduate degree, see how farmers in India use AI to help them with their crops, laugh as scammers get frustrated with an AI chatbot, and despair over ethics of AI development.

Our MACE16 student Michelle Petersen decided to develop her own understanding of the AI agenda as part of her MACE Personal Research Project, and I am pleased to welcome her to the BS7705 Mapping the Creative Economy class today to talk about her work on “What role can machine learning techniques play in the film industry; and how do UK film practitioners appraise machine learning in filmmaking?”. Michelle’s research tackles a complex topic but delivers real accessible understanding. Michelle presented her research at the 16th International Colloquium on Arts, Heritage, Non-Profit and Social Marketing organised by Kingston Business School and the Academy of Marketing 8 September 2017.

Do you think we understand AI and its implications well enough?